How To Have A Positive Mental Health When You’re 20 And Living With Chronic Disease

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I have a childhood best friend named Rain. From the first time that I met her at the daycare center, we had always been playing with each other. She would come over to my house for playdates and vice versa. It was a good thing that we lived in the same neighborhood, so we managed to enter the same elementary school and even class.

People often asked, “How are you still best friends?” I could not blame them for their curiosity because Rain and I were total opposites. Whereas I could spend hours in one corner with a good book or my coloring kit, she always felt the need to get up and explore the room and touch everything in it. Our moods were not matched, considering I rarely smiled around others, while she was quick to offer a smile to anyone. My best friend did cheerleading for extracurricular activities, while I joined the chess club (the most boring of all clubs, according to her).

 My typical reply was, “We are meant to be sisters.” After all, sisters do not always need to have common interests to like each other. Even when I was reading silently, and Rain was practicing her dance routines in the same room, we still felt close. There was never an issue about school popularity, too, which my best friend dominated. We loved supporting each other no matter what.

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When high school ended, Rain and I were lucky to get accepted at NYU. She majored in Dance while I focused on Finance. Again, those subjects were poles apart, but that’s okay. I would always get a front-row seat during her recitals, and she often brought me coffee and donuts whenever I pulled an all-nighter to study. It should not be surprising that our parents agreed to share an apartment a couple of blocks away from the university.

Then, sad news rocked us all when a doctor diagnosed Rain with scoliosis during an executive checkup. The morning before that, she was still joking, “What if the doc finds out that I have an STD that I don’t know about?” But when I came back after my classes in the afternoon, I saw her in a quiet living room in deep thought. Music always followed Rain wherever she went, so I thought that odd.

When I asked what happened, she told me about her scoliosis. Pouting, she said, “I want to dance forever. What guarantee do I have now that I can still do that?”

how-to-have-a-positive-mental-health-when-youre-20-and-living-with-chronic-disease
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I had no idea how to answer my best friend, but I promised to accompany her to her next doctor’s appointment. While waiting for that, Rain made the diagnosis known to her coach, who also felt saddened. Though Rain was slated to star in their Fall recital, the coach thought it was best for her to sit this one out and star in the Winter showcase to rehabilitate her back. Of course, my best friend was not happy about it, but what could she do?

Living With A Chronic Disease At 20

For a few weeks, I hardly saw Rain smile. She attended her classes, went to her part-time job, and even cheered me on during a decathlon competition, but I knew that her mind must be all over the place. That was until the doctor disclosed that her spine slightly curved like the letter S, but it was not prominent yet. (Yey to early diagnosis!)

The appointment happened a day before my best friend’s 20th birthday. When the eve of her birthday came, our other friends and I surprised her with a cake and party. Before blowing the candles, Rain uttered, “Starting tomorrow, I will dance again. Scoliosis can kiss me in the you-know-what.” It earned a roar of laughter and more cheers from us. Knowing Rain for so long, I knew that she meant every word.

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The next morning, my best friend woke me up by blasting the speakers and hip-hopping in my bedroom. She was like, “Get up, sleepyhead! Early birds like us should be exercising by now!” Since I was ever supportive, I joined Rain as she jogged around Central Park. The doctor gave her a go signal to dance again, too, provided that she wore a back brace to avoid straining her spine. Luckily, Rain was hell-bent on starring in their Winter showcase, so she followed everything the doctor said to a T.

Sometimes, Rain would complain about her aching back, which was expected because of the hours of practice she clocked in almost daily. But her regular X-rays showed that her spinal curvature was not getting worse, so she was elated.

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At Present

Rain went on to audition for various Broadway musicals and tried her luck on dance films. She eventually became a choreographer for a musical, and others started contacting her, asking if she could lend them some of her expertise.

How was my best friend’s scoliosis, you might ask? It’s still there – I doubt it will ever go away. However, the most important thing was it no longer in the way of Rain’s dreams.

 

COPD And Its Impact On Family And Friends

 

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COPD is one of the most common chronic lung diseases that affect more than just the individual who is diagnosed. It also has a tremendous impact on family and friends. We will discuss here the ways that this might occur and what can be done.

Some studies reveal that the effect of chronic conditions on family members, friends, and significant others may not be like that of the individual diagnosed. But others have shown that in a lot of ways, it may be the same as well.

Stages of Grief

Supposing that the effects are the same as for the diagnosed individual, the family may also undergo the five phases of grief.

Denial. The usual phrase you hear during this stage would be, “This is not happening to our family! I don’t believe that someone from my family has COPD!” If you have a family member with COPD, you might go through this stage by denying that your loved one’s condition will eventually go away or be cured. This might be a normal method for tackling change. On the contrary, the condition may be considered minor or may be secondary to aging. Just as the way the diagnosed individual denies the impact of COPD, the family member may also be in denial of the changes that are seen along the way.

Anger. Family members feel devastated about the whole thing, oftentimes leading to anger and frustration. Some families project their anger towards the doctors after they have given the diagnosis. They become upset at the researchers for not providing sufficient information about preventing the disease. They may feel mad at the pharmaceutical companies for not developing more effective medicines. Or perhaps you feel anger at the person who is diagnosed because he did not quit smoking or not being mindful of taking care of his physical health.

Negotiating/Bargaining. The guilty feeling comes in after the anger. The family member feels bad about not being able to help the diagnosed person stop smoking sooner, or that he never did anything to avoid him from having the disease. Subsequently, he negotiates to deal with the guilty feeling. He begins to ask himself questions like, “What if he didn’t smoke ever,” or, “What if she didn’t in that polluted factory in the first place,” or, “What if I noticed it earlier?”

 

Source: einsteinsperspectives.com

 

Depression. The sadness about the whole situation becomes more profound. For the diagnosed individual’s family members, they feel very anxious that their loved one will suddenly experience shortness of breath or worse, not be able to breathe at all – and that there is nothing they can do about it. They worry about how much the condition will cost them financially, emotionally, and physically.

Acknowledgment/Acceptance. Ultimately, in the end, you accept the situation as it is, and you help each other cope as a family. The entire family, including the diagnosed individual, learns to accept the changes that have occurred and the changes that will be anticipated. You, as a family member, will eventually commit to doing what is required to help your loved one to live comfortably and cope well with his COPD.

Counselors agree that people go through these stages differently. In some, the stages happen in order and quickly, and in others, they go through them rather slowly. Still, there are several who skip one or two of these stages or even drift in and out of each stage. For example, a person may feel very sad initially, and then he skips and goes right towards acceptance, but then he yoyos through these two stages, going in and out of depression. It is not the same for everyone.

Financial Effects

COPD undoubtedly impacts the whole family financially as well. Patients with chronic lung diseases can live through their condition for a long time, and the condition progresses, the patient can lose or decrease his ability to do particular activities of daily living. This will lead the family to hire someone to care for him, especially if the family members are loaded with responsibilities with their work and their own families as well.

Consequently, the financial impact of the disease will lead to sleeplessness, anxiety, and stress. Some family members quit their jobs so that they could provide support for their diagnosed loved one. They are also worried about the cost of hiring a nurse assistant or paying for their medicines, or the bills for their doctors’ appointments and routine tests. Thus, the financial crisis can affect the economic state of the whole family. As stress and anxiety build-up, possible health-related issues also develop in some family members. It is, therefore, vital that guidance and support from the entire family are present.

 

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Conclusion

Indeed, chronic diseases like COPD impact friends and family members often more than the loved one that has been diagnosed with the disease. It is, therefore, crucial that caregivers acknowledge this fact and consider treating it appropriately. The patient’s support network of family, friends, and significant others is critical to effective patient care.

 

 

 

Getting Over Paranoia: How To Do It The Right Way

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Are you always suspicious of people or things around you? Is it difficult to trust other persons, even those who are close to you? Do you fear that something terrible is going to happen at any time? If you answered yes to all these questions, then you may have paranoia.

Continue reading “Getting Over Paranoia: How To Do It The Right Way”

COVID-19 Awareness: What Makes You Lose Your Motivation?

Understandably, this whole pandemic situation can significantly affect you. It can bring tons of anxiety and stress that you feel you cannot handle. Sometimes it brings a lot of negativity that can make you feel hopeless and worthless. But if you think about it, isn’t it the time where your focus should be on motivating yourself instead of always thinking that there’s nothing you can do? If that’s not how you feel, perhaps there are some reasons you don’t feel motivated at all.

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You Have Zero Connection To Your Goals

Your goals have to be relevant to you. Maybe the reason why you don’t find yourself motivated enough is that you don’t know what you want. Perhaps you thought that you are currently unable to achieve the things you wish to have because of the restrictions you are experiencing right now. That is why you carry an emotional weight. If this is the case, you might want to re-check your goals one more time. And if this pandemic situation is affecting it, consider making adjustments.

You Lack Independence

An unmotivated individual used to complain about everything. Most of the time, his only focus is negativities. That is because he somehow feels anxious about everything, especially the idea of doing things all alone. In this time of crisis, where you have to distance yourself from a lot of people, the tendency to lose all your self-confidence is there. If that is the case, you should find the right reasons for you to stay mentally and emotionally stable.

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You Reward Yourself Too Much

Honestly, it is okay to reward yourself when you achieve something better in life. However, it would be best if you considered that your situation now is different from the way it was. Thus, you need to work hard and strive even though you won’t receive anything. If you are losing all that motivation just because you think your efforts are all going to be useless, you might want to thank life itself for giving you a chance to live through this whole global crisis.

You Feel Bored

Boredom happens to be one of the top reasons why you are unmotivated. Honestly, that is understandable. With all the home quarantine and social distancing protocols, all you have is yourself and a couple of few people to surround you. Sure, there are all kinds of ways that you can entertain yourself. But without social connection and outside-your-home- experiences, things can get a little bit boring. If you continuously feel bored and think that social connection can help you get through emotional strain, use technology for communication.

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You Have All Time In The World

It may sound positive, but having all the time at the tip of your hands is not that motivating. Honestly, it can cause procrastination and too much self-confidence. This pandemic situation allows you to have all the time you need because part of the safety measure is for you to stay at home and spend time with family. However, there is a chance that you often find yourself always lying in bed. Or maybe you spend too much time on your smartphone. It merely implies that having all the time you want is not healthy for your mental, physical, and emotional well-being.

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You Overthink

One essential thing that you need to understand is the danger of overthinking. It keeps you unmotivated because it makes your brain less functional. You become unaware of your response to situations because you shut yourself out from valid reasoning. With that, you get hooked to tons of what-ifs and blame particular things for your life’s misfortune. If that’s how it is, please do take time to practice mindfulness.

How To Stay Mentally Healthy During This Pandemic Lockdown

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Until now, there is still no clear resolution for the global pandemic caused by the Coronavirus. Therefore, people are following social distancing and home quarantine protocols. No one knows when the whole situation will calm down and that what makes every individual lose their sanity. Staying all the time indoors is not healthy. For most people, it causes them different levels of anxiety, stress, and even depression.

Honestly, individuals’ prolonged isolation is not the only problem during this pandemic period. People suffer from the unpredictability of the damage the virus will cause and a sudden break of a regular life routine. They experience fear of getting infected and dying. Individuals get drawn more into negative thinking. With this entire mental health crisis that everyone is experiencing right now, how can they tide over this period?

Well, here are some things one can consider.

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BetterHelp

Being stuck at home for quarantine can be boring and redundant, it’s all the same faces and names on social media. What if I told you I can get you hooked on this life changing channel that doesn’t just teach you about mental health, it helps you through your own bad mental days? Check them out!

Fixing A Routine

Since the world is still suffering from uncertainties, individuals must learn to adapt. Therefore, fixing a routine during this time is a must. It is best to start the day by waking up on time every morning. It will help invigorate the body and mind. After that, do a 10 to 15-minute workout. But note that it is vital to rest a bit before taking a cold shower. Then eat a healthy breakfast before running some morning errands. At noon, individuals can focus on working at home or studying. They can also find some productive things to do, like cleaning the house or organizing stuff. Then in the evening, people can spend time with family. They can binge-watch movies and series on TV or play games. Just avoid late-night sleep so that the waking time won’t get compromised.

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Stay Connected

While all individuals are advised to stay at home, it should not be the reason to stop communicating with others. Yes, social distancing is a crucial safety measure. But there are ways people can connect, and that is through technology usage. They can call or video chat with friends and family from a long distance. It helps ease the emotional burden of staying at home alone. If individuals are with their family during the lockdown, they can consider keeping some exclusive time bonding. Parents and children can watch movies, play games, talk about stories, and more. At dinner time, they can discuss plans and trips they will do after the health crisis. It will help people in the house to refrain from thinking about negative things as they will have reasons to look forward to a positive future.

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Take A Break From The Virus Updates

For individuals who want to keep their mental health intact, they must take a break from any news updates about the virus. Since most reports will only focus on the downfall of humanity, it is safe to keep the emotional and mental state stable. Yes, people have the right to know what is happening around the world. But they should not get too attached to the negativity as it causes them stress. It is essential not to read newspapers with a noticeable negative outbreak update. Individuals should stay away from television news that reports numbers of infected and dead people. And lastly, if possible, people should disconnect from social media from time to time.

This global pandemic is stressful, and it can affect people’s mental health. But they should not let that happen. Because in times like this, the best strength everyone can have is their healthy mind and body. It is their asset in surviving the worse result this virus will offer for at least a few more months.

My Relationship Matters – Fighting Multiple Sclerosis

 

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I was married to my wife way back in 2001, and as far as our relationship was concerned, we already experienced tons of ups and downs that we somehow managed to deal with over the course of our marriage. I was pretty sure that my wife and I were on the same page – dreaming the best for our future – and that’s practically one of the main reasons why we survived our relationship.  However, everything changed after we discovered that she was suffering from autoimmunity. From there, I can say that we reached the peak of the worst thing that can ever happen to our relationship.

 

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My Wife’s Multiple Sclerosis Affected Me

My wife has multiple sclerosis. It is a type of autoimmunity disorder that affects almost everything about her. Aside from its potential damage to her brain and spinal cord, she also suffers from multiple mood alterations. “MS causes damage in many areas of the nervous system. This leads to symptoms that are often different for different people,” Lauren Krupp, M.D., and Robert Charlson, M.D. said. Sometimes, even her psychological state is at stake. I’m not saying she’s crazy but her actions are often confusing and that makes me felt so stressed. Aside from that, she also experiences severe physical discomfort all over her leg that somehow affects her mobility. I won’t try to hide the truth that I am pissed off with her excuses every time she declines my invitation for sexual activity. My wife looks so tired and stressed out and it feels like nothing seems to cheer her up, so I always end up leaving her alone by herself because that’s what she always wants me to do.

 

My wife’s health condition is unpredictable, and nearly every day, we have to expect something new. She often looks down on herself, and her state attracts negative energy that undoubtedly affected both of us. “With MS, the rate of depression is three-times higher than the general population and it is also higher than with other chronic illnesses,” Jack Burks, MD and co-author wrote. Sometimes due to her pessimistic behavior, I often behave poorly towards her. I feel guilty whenever she tries to push herself to get better just because I asked her to work on her situation. My wife’s condition is a bit frustrating, and I have to admit, I am significantly affected by it. It’s not that I don’t want to take care of her, but sometimes it frustrates me because I know there’s nothing I can do about it. Though multiple sclerosis is manageable with medication and therapy, it continues to disappoint me all the time.

https://www.webmd.com/multiple-sclerosis/multiple-sclerosis-physical-therapy

I may sound so insensitive all throughout this episode of our lives, but I know I am just trying to express what a caretaker honestly feels about this kind of situation. It’s depressing, stressful, and tiring. It tends to create a long-lasting impact not only on our emotional and psychological state but also in our overall development. “As a caregiver, you will get angry – at your spouse, at the disease, at doctors who seem uncaring or unwilling to look at the whole patient. Prepare for this anger and try to direct it at the responsible party: the disease,” Robert N. Kraft Ph.D. advised.

 

Source: defense.gov

 

But you know what, even if I feel that I already had enough with the kind of relationship that I have right now, it still won’t stop me from loving my wife. I may sound like an idiot that keeps on complaining how my wife treats me during her struggle with multiple sclerosis, but she’s still my significant other. At the end of the day, I can perfectly tell the world how much she means to me, and by that, I am more than willing to sacrifice everything for her.

 

My Life With Multiple Sclerosis While In A Relationship

 

 

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“Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common disabling neurological disease in young adults. Most develop a pattern of on-again, off-again symptoms, but some have consistently mild symptoms and others have steadily worsening disability,” says psychologist Linda Wasmer Andrews.

Having a potentially disabling condition of the brain and spinal cord is something that I don’t want to talk about because it is so devastating. I am at the point of my life where I am experiencing a lot of stress and depression due to my health condition. I feel so vulnerable to more than thousands of negativity, and it appears like there’s no hope for me. I picture myself as an incapable person that seems to malfunction almost every day, and that ideology affects all the aspects of my life including my relationship with my spouse.

“Depression is not a weakness of character, laziness, or a phase. Tough love, like telling someone to ‘buck up’ or ‘try harder,’ doesn’t work, and worsens the illness.”Deborah Serani, PsyD

The Current Medication

My multiple sclerosis is something that takes almost all of my time and attention so I know I have to follow specific interventions to be able to help myself cope. I am under medication and consider taking disease-modifying drugs such as steroids that I usually take whenever I am experiencing a relapse. Though the prescribed medicines can somehow help me in a way, I am still carefully weighing its potential benefits against any probable side effects because I don’t want to suffer more than what I am experiencing right now. Aside from that, I also attend therapy sessions so I can somehow manage to deal with my situation by understanding my emotional and psychological state.

“Researchers combined two complementary brain imaging techniques to study the relationship between hippocampal immune response, functional connections, and depressive symptoms. As such, the findings suggest that hippocampal inflammation could be the contributing cause of high rates of depression in multiple sclerosis,” according to Rick Nauert PhD.

How The Disease Makes Me Feel

Due to the activeness of my disease, I no longer feel useful at all. Even though I think that medication helps me a bit, it seems like it doesn’t give me the kind of result I need when it comes to dealing with multiple sclerosis properly. Somehow I think that there’s more to it than just attending therapy sessions and popping prescription pills. Its severity means so much to me that it affects the way I think, behave, and react to the things that surround me and it happens to impact my relationships as well. Sometimes it makes me feel so sad and alone that I don’t want anybody else near me. I feel like I am a burden to those people I love, and that kind of situation sucks.

 

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How It Impacts My Significant Other

I know my husband is aware of my MS condition but seeing him suffer from all the stress and pain I am experiencing, I have to admit that it also makes me feel sad about it. It’s not because I am incapable of doing things for myself, but it’s because I know how much he desires to help me on my situation but won’t be able to do anything. Even though we agree on sticking with each other and understanding every pain that we’re going through, I know it is never an easy task for the both of us because eventually, I know I’ll lose all the strength I have, and he’ll lose all the patience he needs.

 

Source: defense.gov

 

My multiple sclerosis is something that makes me incapable of providing for my spouse because instead of me taking care of him, he’s now extending tons of effort into making me feel better. I know it’s a blessing to have my husband with me, but not being able to return all his effort is worse than having a severe case of MS.

Multiple Sclerosis And My Married Life

 

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Dealing with a medical situation is something that puts me on a roller coaster of emotional and psychological stress. “When individuals are very stressed, particularly if they become anxious or depressed, their ability to think clearly and objectively may be affected. People can easily feel less capable or weaker than they truly are, and think that their situation is much worse than it really is,” says Steve Bressert, Ph.D.

Though I am not the one experiencing the said condition, I know my wife is battling so hard to get over her illness, as she desires to live a healthy life. As far as her multiple sclerosis is concerned, it is something that puts us both into a situation that even our relationship can no longer support and fix the damage from her MS.

“Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common disabling neurological disease in young adults. Most develop a pattern of on-again, off-again symptoms, but some have consistently mild symptoms and others have steadily worsening disability,” says psychologist Linda Wasmer Andrews.

I Am Powerless

Honestly, it pains me to see that my wife is suffering from multiple sclerosis almost every day. I can no longer contain the emotional pain I am feeling right now knowing that any moment, her condition can give her tons of physical pain. And what’s worse is that I can’t do anything about it. Every day she is experiencing a relapse and her body shivers. It scares me to death thinking that my wife can snap in an instant. One moment she’s okay, then after a couple of minutes, she’s not. It drives me crazy because her situation is something that I never really understood. Sometimes, even if I think I know a lot about her condition and tell myself that I am capable of helping her all through her struggle; deep in my mind I know I am powerless of doing anything. I hate to see her suffer and I don’t want her to feel pain. But that’s not for me to decide.

 

Source: wikimedia.org

 

The Situation Causes Damage

I believe that my relationship with my wife is something that she uses to be able to hold on to our situation. Our marriage becomes both of our strength so we can fight the damage of multiple sclerosis in our lives. However, the severity of the medical condition is suddenly taking us away from each other and even though it only makes a slow pinch of changes in our everyday routine, it still gives us an absolute mental and emotional disaster.

I read that, “As a caregiver, you will get angry – at your spouse, at the disease, at doctors who seem uncaring or unwilling to look at the whole patient. Prepare for this anger and try to direct it at the responsible party: the disease.” This was said by Robert N. Kraft Ph.D. from personal experience being the husband of a woman with MS.

 

Source: defense.gov

 

I want to be with my wife, I love her, and I want to take care of her. But the intensity of the burden of dealing with a person with multiple sclerosis is something that tends to give me a severe medical depression. I feel so down and hopeless right now. I know this is not helping me at any cost and it doesn’t help my wife as well. But the emotional stress I am suffering right now because of my wife’s condition is immeasurable.

Everybody may experience a different side of a struggle from multiple sclerosis, and they will eventually end up losing everything too. I know I am not worthy enough to support my wife if I won’t be able to recover from the depression I am having right now. I need my wife more than she needs me, so I have to make sure that I am 100% capable of providing her the support she needs. I don’t want her to think that her condition pushes me to my limits that’s why I know I need to recover from my medical condition so that I can entirely give her the kind of support, love, and care she deserves.

 

Can Multiple Sclerosis Destroy My Love Life?

 

Source: defense.gov

 

The emotional and physical connections between couples are essential towards a long-lasting relationship, and there is a more significant need for it when one or both of them have Multiple Sclerosis (MS). MS is “widely considered an autoimmune disorder, meaning that the immune system of an otherwise normal person is tricked into attacking healthy parts of the body, MS causes damage in many areas of the nervous system. This leads to symptoms that are often different for different people. These include things as seemingly diverse as fatigue, walking problems, depression, cognitive impairment, muscle tightness, or bladder problems,” says Lauren Krupp, M.D., and Robert Charlson, M.D.

The symptoms of MS can primarily affect the way people feel or how they connect towards their partners. It may also substantially influence how they regard previous and current activities that support their relationship. As such, couples can expect possible effects of MS on their current or future situations.

“New research now suggests that inflammation within the hippocampus — influenced by the immune system responses — may be the reason for the increased prevalence of depression among people with M.S.,” according to Rick Nauert PhD, and it’s very devastating to have a partner or spouse with depression and MS at the same time.

 

Source: wikimedia.org

 

The Impact Of MS

An individual with MS will substantially change as the disease progresses. The changes will impact the relationship from mild to severe levels. Some symptoms of MS may strip them (not all) of sexual activity or undoubtedly lessens it from what it used to be. There is a possibility that couples with MS may need to pull off with cuddling, hugging, stroking, and kissing as these are the primary forms of intimate connection. However, there are various ways to keep the intimacy in the relationship alive. You can research for things that you can do and what you can’t during sexual intercourse. Ask healthcare professionals regarding how to deal with MS symptoms that get in the way of your sexual activities together. They will also give you advice about beneficial sexual health options as well.

A couple in a relationship will change over the years and will require adjustments to move on. However, individuals with MS tend to hold on to their mentality shift during the progression of the disease which may cause a severe personality change. Their partners may not recognize them anymore due to these character changes and that somehow leads to a breakup.

Individuals with MS will experience the symptoms of the disease without prior signs and will not be able to know how long these will last or how severe they would be. MS will put a massive burden on their partners which may influence them to give up the relationship. The diagnosis of MS and its symptoms may create new arguments due to the changes that MS can bring in their relationship, social lives, and responsibilities of a person. The couple’s plan for the future may drastically change or possibly halted.

 

Source: pxhere.com

 

The Verdict

Multiple sclerosis is a life-changing disease, but it should not keep you away from holding a positive outlook on life. It is also important not to drown in self-pity for it will significantly affect you and your partner. Lastly, never think that you are alone during your battle with this disease because there are thousands of people who can relate to your situation. Find the strength to address the issue so you can save your relationship from drying.

“I would strongly recommend that if you feel that your personality has changed, if you find yourself withdrawing and not able to complete tasks that you were once able to complete, you feel blue, helpless, hopeless, have lost interest in things that you once enjoyed, that you get scheduled for a psychological evaluation,” says Amy Sullivan, Psy.D.

A significant ratio of couples with MS will have their relationship compromised which may ultimately end up in separation. However, it is not an impossible feat to keep the connection with efforts. There is a greater need for understanding, patience, and a lot of planning coming from both individuals in the relationship.